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Why impeachment can't stop Trump from fundraising in the future

January 12, 2021. Summarized by summa-bot.

Compression ratio: 61.5%. 2 min read.

House Democrats on Monday pushed ahead with their effort to have President Donald Trump impeached, convicted in the Senate and disqualified from ever holding federal office again over last week's siege on the US Capitol by a pro-Trump mob.

House Democrats on Monday pushed ahead with their effort to have President Donald Trump impeached, convicted in the Senate and disqualified from ever holding federal office again over last week's siege on the US Capitol by a pro-Trump mob.

But even in the unlikely event that two-thirds of senators would agree to convict Trump, there's little to stop him from continuing to ask his supporters for money in the months and years ahead, campaign finance experts say.

In addition to his presidential campaign committee, Trump already has established a post-presidency vehicle — the Save America political action committee — that can help underwrite his expenses, fund travel and staff and support like-minded candidates.

Although Twitter's decision Friday night to permanently ban Trump from its platform immediately cut the President off from his 88. 7 million followers, Trump and his campaign committee still have "an enormously valuable asset in their email list," Ryan said.

By CNN's count, the Trump campaign had sent 606 fundraising emails between 11 p. m. ET election night and Wednesday afternoon, shortly before the Capitol was breached.

The Trump campaign did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

But Trump campaign adviser Jason Miller has indicated the President intends to remain a fundraising force, telling The Washington Post over the weekend that Trump still is "the biggest name in Republican politics" and plans deploy millions of dollars to help GOP congressional candidates in the 2022 midterm elections.

House Democrats plan to vote Wednesday to impeach President Trump, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer told Democrats on a caucus call Monday, setting up an impeachment vote one week after rioters incited by Trump overran Capitol police and breached some of the most secure areas of the US Capitol.

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