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White House counsel and former Attorney General Barr warned Trump not to self-pardon

January 11, 2021. Summarized by summa-bot.

Compression ratio: 22.2%. 2 min read.

White House counsel Pat Cipollone and former Attorney General William Barr have warned President Trump that they do not believe he should pardon himself, multiple sources familiar with the matter tell CNN.

White House counsel Pat Cipollone and former Attorney General William Barr have warned President Trump that they do not believe he should pardon himself, multiple sources familiar with the matter tell CNN.

Trump has in recent weeks raised the idea of pardoning himself, as well as members of his family, though it is not known if he has done so since Wednesday’s attack on the Capitol.

White House officials are also contemplating how the federal investigation into the insurrection impacts other pardons Trump has discussed, such as for his personal attorney Rudy Giuliani who called for "trial for combat" at Wednesday’s rally before the Capitol was stormed.

Additional pardons are expected from the White House before Trump leaves office next week.

Barr believes a 1974 Justice Department legal memo finding that the President cannot pardon himself should stand, and that Cipollone has not asked the Justice Department Office of Legal Counsel for a re-examination of the issue, according to two sources.

Two separate sources close to Vice President Mike Pence say it is highly unlikely that Pence would issue a pardon to Trump in this scenario.

Pence had been a loyal supporter of the President, but now feels frustrated and disappointed with Trump for his behavior around the insurrection and not calling to check on him during and after the riots, multiple sources say.

On a call moments ago, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer announced that the House will meet Wednesday to vote on impeaching President Trump, sources on the call tell CNN.

House Democrats formally introduced their resolution today to impeach Trump, charging him with "incitement of insurrection" for his role in last week's deadly US Capitol attack.

Some background: Washington, DC, Mayor Muriel Bowser on Sunday sent a letter to President Trump asking for an emergency declaration in order to get additional funding for Biden's inauguration as safety concerns mount following the US Capitol breach.

DC Attorney General Karl Racine said his office is looking at potentially charging President Trump and others for inciting violence when they spoke to a crowd that later breached the US Capitol on Jan. 6.

As House Democrats push to impeach President Trump, there is talk about whether section 3 of the 14th Amendment might apply to him.

Eric Gavelek Munchel, who was arrested Sunday after being depicted in photos wearing black paramilitary gear and carrying plastic restraints inside the Capitol, had been first stopped by law enforcement on Jan. 6 because he was carrying a Taser for self-protection while attending the pro-Trump rally, according to his newly released charging documents.

Some House Republicans are privately discussing whether to censure President Trump as a way to express their disapproval about the President's actions without going along with the Democratic effort to impeach him, according to several GOP sources.

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