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Trump's outcasts in the civil and foreign service may get a second chance under Biden

November 25, 2020. Summarized by summa-bot.

It's been a hard four years for many career government servants. Their expertise was set aside for President Donald Trump's flashy political appointees, and their fellow professionals were marginalized, derided as "Deep State' interlopers and even fired.

Their expertise was set aside for President Donald Trump's flashy political appointees, and their fellow professionals were marginalized, derided as "Deep State' interlopers and even fired.

Yet there's also a clear preference among Biden's advisers for career professionals either alienated or drummed out during the Trump administration.

"There is a need for a certain number of very experienced senior people where there's a shortage," Ronald Neumann, the President of the American Academy of Diplomacy and a former career ambassador, told CNN regarding the State Department.

One of Trump's first purges came at the top of the Justice Department hierarchy was Sally Yates -- and now she's considered a top contender for attorney general under Biden.

As the deputy attorney general from the Obama administration, Yates became acting attorney general following Trump's inauguration and was expected to serve in that role until Jeff Sessions was confirmed by the Senate to lead the Justice Department.

Vindman's own testimony before Congress provided details about the July 2019 phone call with new Ukraine president Volodymyr Zelensky when Trump asked Zelensky to help investigate Biden.

Glick began her career as a foreign service officer at the State Department and also worked for Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan, a Republican, as deputy secretary of the state's Department of Aging.

Glick's ouster came the same day that John Barsa's term as acting administrator of the agency expired under the Federal Vacancies Reform Act, and sources told CNN that she was fired so he could remain at the helm.

Sources told CNN they feared Glick's ouster could imperil the ease of a transition between a Trump and a Biden presidency at the agency.

A source close to Bonnie Glick told CNN that given that she's a Republican she would not be interested in rejoining USAID under a Biden administration.

But he earned the wrath of the President and his allies after Krebs and his agency began actively debunking many of the claims made by Trump and his supporters that there was widespread election fraud.

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