Clear. 72.7   F New York
AI-Powered News Summarizer
Top Stories

Trump gets what he wants in Big 10 football flip, but he's flailing in fight for Midwest votes

September 16, 2020. Summarized by summa-bot.

President Donald Trump got his football wish: The Big 10 college football conference will begin playing in late October. Trump had been pushing for the league, which has schools in Michigan, Minnesota, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin among others, to start playing and had talks with the league. The league had previously announced a suspension of its schedule.

(CNN)President Donald Trump got his football wish: The Big 10 college football conference will begin playing in late October.

Trump had been pushing for the league, which has schools in Michigan, Minnesota, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin among others, to start playing and had talks with the league.

Former Vice President Joe Biden made ads showing empty college football stadiums with the blame landing at Trump's feet.

As I pointed out last month, 51% of Midwesterners consider themselves college football fans.

Trump also probably knows that Republicans really do like college football, according to a study of Google search patterns from 2017.

Moreover, Trump has been pushing for a return to normal activities, and few things say normal in the Midwest quite like college football.

Still, you might think that if the push for the Big 10 to return -- something Trump has done for weeks -- was such a great political play, you would start to see his poll numbers move in the Midwest.

The polling over the last few weeks has been mediocre to downright dire for Trump in a number of these states.

There hasn't been a lot of high-quality polling out of Michigan, though the average continues to put Trump behind Biden by around 7 to 8 points.

Instead, polls released by ABC News/Washington Post, CBS News/YouGov and the New York Times/Siena College have him trailing by anywhere from 9 to 16 points.

Among likely voters in recent polls from NBC News/Marist College, Monmouth University and Quinnipiac University, Trump's down an average of 6 points.

The New York Times/Siena College poll put Trump behind by 5 points.

So while Trump has made football a part of his political playbook, part of his problem might just be that although folks like college football, they may not like the idea of it right now.

And as I noted a few weeks ago, most fans were in favor of a delay to the college football season.

And again, maybe the actual resumption of college football play will shift the political math here.

Summarizer is on Google News. Now you can get the latest AI summarized news on your favorite news platform.

Don't like Google News? We have an RSS Feed for you.

Suggestions