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Top scientists warn of 'ghastly future' for planet

January 13, 2021. Summarized by summa-bot.

Compression ratio: 41.4%. 2 min read.

The world is on track for a "ghastly future," an international group of scientists has warned, with accelerating climate change and biodiversity loss threatening the survival of all of the planet's species unless world leaders face up to the challenge and act urgently.

(CNN)The world is on track for a "ghastly future," an international group of scientists has warned, with accelerating climate change and biodiversity loss threatening the survival of all of the planet's species unless world leaders face up to the challenge and act urgently.

Citing some 150 studies describing the world's environmental changes, the experts warn that world leaders need a "cold shower" wake-up call when it comes to the state of the planet, saying environmental conditions are "far more dangerous than currently believed" by civilians and scientists alike.

"Humanity is causing a rapid loss of biodiversity and, with it, Earth's ability to support complex life," lead author Professor Corey Bradshaw, of Flinders University in Australia, said in a statement.

Time and again, scientists, experts and environmentalists have warned that the earth has reached a crucial tipping point -- recent research from the World Wide Fund for Nature found the world's wildlife populations have fallen by an average of 68% in just over four decades, with human consumption behind the devastating decline.

UN experts have been clear: If we maintain our trajectory in the accelerating climate crisis, biodiversity will continue to deteriorate -- with devastating outcomes for the planet's animals, plants and people.

But the international experts warn that no leader or political system is prepared for the disasters associated with biodiversity loss, or capable of addressing the crisis.

"Stopping biodiversity loss is nowhere close to the top of any country's priorities, trailing far behind other concerns such as employment, healthcare, economic growth, or currency stability," Professor Paul Ehrlich of Stanford University, one of the study's authors, said.

The scientists warn that world leaders must act to avoid a grim future while planning for impending changes the planet is set to face -- but hope is not lost.

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