Clear. 32.6   F New York
AI-Powered News Summarizer
Top Stories

Texas is still reeling from devastating winter storms and for some, recovery could take months

February 22, 2021. Summarized by summa-bot.

Compression ratio: 24.7%. 2 min read.

Texans Cheerleaders and other volunteers pack food to distribute to hundreds people picking supplies from their cars after a freeze that left the Houston area depleted of resources, Sunday, Feb. 21, 2021, in Houston.

While state officials work to turn the lights back on for the remaining Texas households still in the dark and address widespread water disruptions, some residents are faced with damage that could take weeks -- or months -- to recover from.

While state officials work to turn the lights back on for the remaining Texas households still in the dark and address widespread water disruptions, some residents are faced with damage that could take weeks -- or months -- to recover from.

"For many people in our city with means, with insurance, this week has been a significant inconvenience, but they have the means and ability to quickly transition and move forward," Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner said in a news conference late last week.

The disruptions have impacted more than 1,200 public water systems in 199 counties in the state, Rasp said, adding that about 147 public water systems serving "just under" 120,000 people were still nonoperational.

For residents dealing with more lasting damage, Abbott said the state was bringing in more plumbers to meet the high demand of customers with broken pipes and urged residents to get in touch with their insurance agents to help address what may have been destroyed.

Last week, Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller said grocery stores were unable to get shipments of some products and severe weather conditions had created a "food supply chain problem like we've never seen before, even with Covid-19. "

Abbott said the state Public Utility Commission issued a moratorium on customer disconnections for nonpayment to address "skyrocketing energy bills" that some residents are facing.

The governor said he held an emergency meeting with legislative leaders to "shield Texas families from unreasonable bills," and more meetings are scheduled this week to "get to the bottom of this but also to provide relief and support to our fellow Texans. "

Summarizer is on Google News. Now you can get the latest AI summarized news on your favorite news platform.

Don't like Google News? We have an RSS Feed for you.

Suggestions