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Texas electric grid operator expects "to come out of emergency conditions" today

February 19, 2021. Summarized by summa-bot.

Compression ratio: 22.7%. 2 min read.

Oncor apprentice lineman Brendan Waldon repairing a utility pole that was damaged by the winter storm that passed through Texas Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021 in Odessa, Texas. (Odessa American/Eli Hartman)

The Electric Reliability Council of Texas, known as ERCOT, said in a tweet this morning that the “grid operator expects to come out of emergency conditions later today.”

The Electric Reliability Council of Texas, known as ERCOT, said in a tweet this morning that the “grid operator expects to come out of emergency conditions later today. ”

ERCOT, which operates about 90% of Texas’ power grid, has come under fire for alleged failures to prepare the state for the winter storm that left millions without power in the state this week.

As the impact of a winter storm continues to hit millions of Texans, many are still without power, food, or water.

About 13 million Texans, nearly half the state's population, were under a boil-water advisory Thursday, according to Executive Director for the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Toby Baker.

While much of the power in the state has been restored, residents continue to face freezing temperatures and water shortages due to overwhelmed water systems and leaks caused by frozen pipes.

Bill Magness, president and CEO of ERCOT, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, defended the actions of the nonprofit corporation that manages most of the state’s power grid after more than four million Texans lost power during a devastating winter storm.

After millions of homes and businesses lost power for several days in Texas, nearly half of the state’s residents are now dealing with water disruptions, including boil water advisories, broken pipes, and offline treatment plants.

As Texas begins restoring power after a devastating week of freezing temperatures and winter storms, the state is confronting a new crisis: overwhelmed water systems that could extend misery for much of the population.

About 13 million Texans, nearly half the state's population, remained under a boil-water advisory Thursday, according to Executive Director for the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Toby Baker.

In Austin alone, the state capital's water supply lost 325 million gallons due to burst pipes, Austin Water Director Greg Meszaros said during a news conference Thursday.

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