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Supreme Court poised for another historic spring

April 25, 2021. Summarized by summa-bot.

Compression ratio: 22.4%. 2 min read.

The Supreme Court is staring at its self-imposed end of June deadline, but the justices have not yet released some of the most significant opinions of the term, including a challenge to the Affordable Care Act, the Voting Rights Act and a case on religious liberty, an issue that has split the justices along familiar ideological divides this year.

(CNN)The Supreme Court is staring at its self-imposed end of June deadline, but the justices have not yet released some of the most significant opinions of the term, including a challenge to the Affordable Care Act, the Voting Rights Act and a case on religious liberty, an issue that has split the justices along familiar ideological divides this year.

"The non profits are asking the Supreme Court to make it harder for the government to require the disclosure of donor information," said Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer, an expert on campaign finance at Notre Dame Law School.

"While the case is about a state Attorney General asking for this information, if the Supreme Court raised the bar here, that would likely also apply to election donor disclosure laws down the road. "

On Wednesday, the court will hear a First Amendment case concerning the authority of public school officials to discipline students for what they say outside of school.

Supporters of expanding religious liberty rights hope the court's conservative majority, expanding upon a trend from last term, will continue to hold the government to a higher standard when it comes to regulations that impact religious believers.

The Supreme Court is considering two provisions of Arizona law that the Democratic National Committee says violate the historic Voting Rights Act that prohibits laws that result in racial discrimination.

Holder, effectively gutting Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act, a provision that required states with a history of discrimination to obtain the permission of the federal government or the courts before enacting new laws related to voting.

Since that decision, challengers to voting restrictions have increasingly turned to Section 2 of the law, that holds that no voting regulation can be imposed that "results in a denial or abridgment of the right of any citizen of the United States to vote on account of race or color. " Democrats fear the new conservative majority on the court will now weaken Section 2.

The Supreme Court is again considering the power of union organizers in a case that pits agriculture businesses and privacy rights advocates against big labor and raises questions of when the government can allow access to private property without compensation.

A ruling against the union position in the case would come after the Supreme Court in 2018 dealt a blow to the funding of public-sector unions.

by summa-bot

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