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Study shows AstraZeneca vaccine provides "minimal protection" against South Africa Covid-19 variant, Oxford University says

February 7, 2021. Summarized by summa-bot.

Compression ratio: 20.4%. 2 min read.

Early data suggest two doses of the Oxford/AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine provide “minimal protection” against mild and moderate infection from the variant first identified in South Africa, the University of Oxford said Sunday.

Early data suggest two doses of the Oxford/AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine provide “minimal protection” against mild and moderate infection from the variant first identified in South Africa, the University of Oxford said Sunday.

After the study was reported Saturday by the Financial Times, AstraZeneca said in a statement it believes the vaccine could provide protection against severe disease, and said it has started to adapt the vaccine against the variant “so that it is ready for Autumn delivery should it be needed. ”

In a news release Sunday, the unions said the tentative agreement "outlines the baseline health and safety standards and vaccine access to physically reopen public schools. "

The World Health Organization’s independent panel on vaccinations will meet on Monday to discuss the AstraZeneca vaccine and studies assessing how effective it is against the virus variant first identified in South Africa, Maria Van Kerkhove, WHO’s technical lead for Covid-19, said on CBS’s Face the Nation Sunday.

A spokesperson for AstraZeneca told CNN on Saturday that a small trial found the company’s Covid-19 vaccine provides limited protection against mild disease in cases caused by the B. 1. 351 variant.

“Our independent panel group on vaccinations is meeting tomorrow to specifically discuss the AstraZeneca vaccine as well as the results coming out of South Africa to determine what does this mean in terms of the vaccines going forward,” Van Kerkhove said.

The British approach on having a bigger gap between the first and second Covid-19 vaccine dose has been “vindicated,” World Health Organization Special Envoy David Nabarro said on Sunday.

However, speaking earlier on NBC's Meet the Press, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said there may not be enough time to study the efficacy of receiving one vaccine dose and people should stick to the available data.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told NBC’s Meet the Press Sunday that the number of vaccines doses available is improving, but demand was always going to going to be greater than the early supply.

“The demand clearly outstrips the supply right now,” Fauci said when asked what’s holding up US vaccine supply.

In addition to more doses of the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines coming available, Fauci said, the Johnson & Johnson vaccine may be available soon.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said there may not be enough time to study the efficacy of receiving one vaccine dose and people should stick to the available data.

by summa-bot

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