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Small businesses across America were struggling to survive. Now they face a new threat

June 1, 2020. Summarized by summa-bot.

Flames rise from a liquor store near the Third Police Precinct on May 28, 2020 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, during a protest over the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man, who died after a police officer kneeled on his neck for several minutes. - A police precinct in Minnesota went up in flames late on May 28 in a third day of demonstrations as the so-called Twin Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul seethed over the shocking police killing of a handcuffed black man. The precinct, which police had abandoned, burned after a group of protesters pushed through barriers around the building, breaking windows and chanting slogans. A much larger crowd demonstrated as the building went up in flames. (Photo by Kerem Yucel / AFP) (Photo by KEREM YUCEL/AFP via Getty Images)

As protests over the death of George Floyd erupt across the nation, small businesses that have struggled for months because of the coronavirus pandemic are facing a new threat to their survival.

New York (CNN Business)As protests over the death of George Floyd erupt across the nation, small businesses that have struggled for months because of the coronavirus pandemic are facing a new threat to their survival.

Shop owners say their stores have suffered damage such as broken windows and that merchandise has been looted.

"I'm dealing with such a double whammy as a business owner," said Beth Aberg, owner of Random Harvest Home, a home furnishings chain with three locations that were mostly shut down for more than two months.

"I have been doing everything I know how to finally reopen the stores safely for everyone, but now I face an entirely new situation," she said.

"This damage (and in some cases looting) took place as some retailers were preparing to resume a level of operations in accordance with the Governor's phased re-opening," Sido said.

Karen Bremer, CEO of the Georgia Restaurant Association, said in a statement that "the restaurants that were vandalized last night had recently re-opened," adding that the damage has "created more obstacles to our recovery. "

For many small businesses, damage from the protests could be the final blow.

Nug's stores were left with broken windows, stolen plants and damaged manufacturing equipment, he said.

Greg Milefsky, owner of Balance Bicycle in Richmond, Virginia, said he might have to move his shop because of looting.

"This cause means a lot to us," said Hassan, adding that most of the demonstrators were peaceful, and that some had helped her board up the store on Thursday night.

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