Clear. 59.6   F New York
AI-Powered News Summarizer
Top Stories

Inside the campaign to cut immigration amid the coronavirus pandemic

May 8, 2020. Summarized by summa-bot.

In a late-night tweet last month, President Donald Trump teased a sweeping executive order that would suspend immigration to the United States due to the coronavirus pandemic, building up anticipation among allies who for years have urged Trump to reduce levels of immigration. But the text of the proclamation, released days later, fell far short of the President's promise.

(CNN)In a late-night tweet last month, President Donald Trump teased a sweeping executive order that would suspend immigration to the United States due to the coronavirus pandemic, building up anticipation among allies who for years have urged Trump to reduce levels of immigration.

Behind the scenes, the push to limit immigration during the coronavirus pandemic has been led by Stephen Miller, Trump's lead immigration adviser and the architect of the President's hardline immigration agenda, according to administration officials.

After the President's April proclamation limiting green cards, Miller cast the move as a first step toward reducing the flow of immigrants coming into the United States.

Since the release of the proclamation, there's been various requests that have come out from the Trump administration for input for an expected follow-up order, said Roy Beck, president of NumbersUSA, a group that advocates for reduced immigration.

In March, the Trump administration also invoked a public health law, citing the coronavirus, that largely sealed off the US-Mexico border and allowed for the swift removal of migrants apprehended at the border -- a move that raised concerns among officials involved in compiling data who believed it to be driven by political motivations.

As next steps are considered, however, the administration has proceeded with other immigration restrictions, including quickly expelling migrants encountered at the southern border under new coronavirus restrictions.

In the early weeks of the pandemic, as senior leaders at the US Centers for Disease and Prevention poured over data on coronavirus cases in Mexico to report back to the White House, the impression to those in the Atlanta-based agency was that closing the southern border was already a foregone conclusion, according to a senior CDC official involved in the matter.

CDC data showed there were more cases of coronavirus in other parts of the world, including in the United States, compared to Mexico and Canada, according to the source and a second federal health official.

Summarizer is on Google News. Now you can get the latest AI summarized news on your favorite news platform.

Don't like Google News? We have an RSS Feed for you.

Suggestions