Clouds. 74.3   F New York
AI-Powered News Summarizer
Top Stories

How 'good White people' derail racial progress

August 1, 2020. Summarized by summa-bot.

In this Sept. 26, 2019, photo, protesters stand outside Howard County government building in Ellicott City, Md. The group is opposed to a school redistricting plan that will force some students to be relocated to other schools. (Regina Garcia Cano/AP)

Any attack against entrenched racism will run into a formidable barrier: White people who support progressive causes yet oppose efforts to make their schools and neighborhoods more diverse.

It was there that progressive White parents mobilized with other groups to try to stop a school integration plan that would bus poor students, who were mostly Black and brown, to more affluent, whiter schools.

But some scholars and activists say good White people -- the progressive folks in Blue states, the kind who would have voted for Obama a third time if they could -- are some of the most tenacious supporters of systemic racism.

Scholars say these people are often motived by unconscious racism they are loathe to admit and disguise their racial hostility with innocuous-sounding terms like "neighborhood schools" and "property values. "

There can't be real change until White people are willing to give up some power and resources where they live, says Matthew Delmont, author of "Why Busing Failed: Race, Media, and the National Resistance to School Desegregation. "

"The sign that change is real as opposed to symbolic is that people are making real changes to things close to them in their own backyards, such as supporting more affordable housing in their neighborhood, or programs that would integrate schools," says Delmont, a history professor at Dartmouth College.

But statistics suggest that these lives don't matter as much if more Black people start sending their children to school with White kids.

These high levels of school segregation remain despite evidence that integration benefited both Whites and Blacks at the height of school desegregation from 1964 to 1980.

High school graduation rates and test scores for Black students improved significantly during that era, but integration also reduced racial prejudice among Whites.

These high levels of school segregation remain despite evidence that integration benefited both Whites and Blacks at the height of school desegregation from 1964 to 1980, some education experts say.

High school graduation rates and test scores for Black students improved significantly during that era, but integration also reduced racial prejudice among Whites, wrote two scholars, Elise C.

It would be unfair to say that all progressive White parents who recoil at changing the racial makeup of their children's public schools are hypocrites.

There's also a long tradition of White resistance to racially integrated housing.

"But Black-White segregation remains strikingly high," says Richard D.

"Middle-class Blacks live in neighborhoods with higher poverty rates than low-income Whites; and African American households headed by an individual with a bachelor's degree have less wealth, on average, than White households headed by an individual who lacks a high school degree. "

Some White families insist on sending their kids to racially diverse public schools and try their best to worship in integrated communities and live in racially mixed neighborhoods.

He says there's also a selfish reason White parents should not fear racially integrated schools.

Unless more White people are willing to give up something to change the racial makeup of where they live and send their children to school, there will be no true racial awakening in America.

Summarizer is on Google News. Now you can get the latest AI summarized news on your favorite news platform.

Don't like Google News? We have an RSS Feed for you.

Suggestions