Clear. 41.2   F New York
AI-Powered News Summarizer
Top Stories

Garland vowed to keep politics out of the Department of Justice

February 23, 2021. Summarized by summa-bot.

Compression ratio: 25.1%. 2 min read.

Judge Merrick Garland testifies before a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on his nomination to be US Attorney General on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on February 22, 2021. (Photo by Demetrius Freeman / POOL / AFP) (Photo by DEMETRIUS FREEMAN/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

During the first day of his confirmation hearing yesterday, Attorney General nominee Merrick Garland vowed to keep politics out of the Justice Department and to fully prosecute the "heinous" crimes committed in the attack on the US Capitol in the deadly riot on Jan. 6.

During the first day of his confirmation hearing yesterday, Attorney General nominee Merrick Garland vowed to keep politics out of the Justice Department and to fully prosecute the "heinous" crimes committed in the attack on the US Capitol in the deadly riot on Jan. 6.

Garland was praised by Republicans and Democrats alike in his testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday, where he faced questions about the politically charged investigations that await him if confirmed to lead the Justice Department, including a federal probe into Biden's son Hunter Biden and whether the DOJ should wade into former President Donald Trump's role in the riot.

Garland, who led the Justice Department investigation into the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, said that the current threat from White supremacists now is a "more dangerous period than we faced at that time," vowing to make his first priority to ensure investigators have all the resources they need to investigate the attack on the Capitol.

The attorney general nominee also stressed that the Justice Department's role is meant to "serve the Rule of Law and to ensure equal justice under the law," noting that last year was the 150th anniversary of the Justice Department's founding in the aftermath of the Civil War, and that its core mission was to secure the civil rights promised by the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments.

Judge Merrick Garland was asked to define systemic racism, implicit bias and racism during the first day of his Senate confirmation hearing on Monday, and his answers laid out a stark contrast with the last Senate-confirmed attorney general from the Trump administration.

"I don't agree that there's systemic racism in the police departments generally in this country," Barr said in that hearing.

If confirmed as attorney general, Judge Merrick Garland will be tasked with leading a Department of Justice that has faced multiple controversies.

Barr also resisted demands that the Justice Department disclose an ongoing investigation into Hunter Biden, son of President-elect Joe Biden, a move that Trump and his allies believe made a difference in the election.

President Biden's Attorney General nominee Merrick Garland isn't the only nominee facing the Senate this week.

Becerra will stress his upbringing as a son of a Mexican immigrant, his father's recent passing and his history expanding health care access during his time as a longtime congressman and California's attorney general, in a pitch to senators at his confirmation hearing on Tuesday, according to his prepared opening statement first obtained by CNN.

Yet the televised tableau last mont of President Biden presenting Judge Merrick Garland to be the next attorney general, provided a remarkable contrast to the Trump way and demonstrated that a restorative agenda has begun.

Following Attorney General nominee Merrick Garland's testimony yesterday, a group of outside witnesses will testify today before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Summarizer is on Google News. Now you can get the latest AI summarized news on your favorite news platform.

Don't like Google News? We have an RSS Feed for you.

Suggestions