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From the pandemic declaration to the fall surge, here's a timeline of Covid-19 in the US

October 17, 2020. Summarized by summa-bot.

Medics transfer a patient on a stretcher from an ambulance outside of Emergency at Coral Gables Hospital where Coronavirus patients are treated in Coral Gables near Miami, on July 30, 2020. - Florida has emerged as a major new epicenter of the US battle against the disease, with confirmed cases recently surpassing New York and now second only to California. The state toll has leapt over the past week and more than 6,500 people have died from the disease there, according to health officials. More than 460,000 people have been infected with the virus in Florida, which has a population of 21 million, and a quarter of the state's cases are in Miami. The US has tallied a total of 151,826 deaths from COVID-19, making it the hardest-hit country in the world. (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA / AFP) (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images)

Experts say the fall Covid-19 surge is here. Infections and hospitalizations are rising across the country. And one leading health official says daily Covid-19 deaths could soon begin climbing, too.

Infections and hospitalizations are rising across the country.

On April 10, about a month after Covid-19 was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization, the US hit its first high point during the pandemic, peaking at an average of a little more than 31,800 daily cases, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

The country also eclipsed more than half a million Covid-19 infections.

Cases were clustered mostly in New York, with other, smaller outbreaks in places such as Washington state, Louisiana and Illinois.

Around that time, New York state had more infections than any other country in the world, with more than 160,000 cases.

As of October 16, the state has reported more than 481,000 infections.

By June 9, the US had flattened the curve and was averaging about 20,340 new cases daily, Johns Hopkins data showed.

By July 22, the nation reached its highest peak of the pandemic, to date, averaging more than 67,000 cases daily.

By September 12, the summer peak had slipped down to a little more than 34,300 average new cases daily, according to data from Johns Hopkins.

Now, we're seeing another rise in cases.

The nation is averaging more than 53,000 new cases per day and at least 26 states reported more than 1,000 new infections in a day this week.

The crush of new cases in the Midwest hasn't let up and now places like the Northeast, which has remained relatively stable since the spring, is seeing a rise in cases.

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