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For the mob that stormed the US Capitol, a lesson from Charlottesville

January 12, 2021. Summarized by summa-bot.

Compression ratio: 19.9%. 2 min read.

Trump supporters gather outside the Capitol, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

What happened to the alt-right after Charlottesville could be a guide for what happens to QAnon and the mob that stormed the US Capitol last week.

(CNN)What happened to the alt-right after Charlottesville could be a guide for what happens to QAnon and the mob that stormed the US Capitol last week.

The alt right was a version of white supremacy that attracted a much younger crowd through the internet, and it aimed to work within mainstream politics to advance racism.

This happened because the alt-right was hammered on three fronts -- social, financial and legal.

To take one prominent example, in 2016, when he was running the Trump campaign, Steve Bannon infamously said his Breitbart News website was "the platform for the alt-right. "

After Charlottesville, the term "alt-right" was poison.

Those in the alt-right who weren't doxxed lived in paralyzing fear of it, they've told me.

White power programmers tried to make their own versions -- Hatreon, GoyFundMe -- but that didn't work, because then payment processors dropped them.

The civil rights advocacy group Color of Change had been pressuring financial services companies to stop processing the payments of White nationalists well before Charlottesville.

Color of Change president Rashad Robinson told CNN that at the time, he thought it was absurd that it was so easy to give White nationalists money.

PayPal was the only company that worked well with Color of Change to cut off White power groups, Robinson said.

In the fall of 2018, Chris Cantwell, who I'd interviewed in the Vice documentary about Charlottesville, told me he'd been dropped by nearly every payment processor.

At one point, alt-right figurehead Richard Spencer told me he could get money only through paper checks.

Trump is certainly in a stronger position, in terms of power and money, than even the most affluent marchers in Charlottesville.

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