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Facebook and Twitter put warning label on Trump's posts on voting twice

September 12, 2020. Summarized by summa-bot.

President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at MBS International Airport, Thursday, Sept. 10, 2020, in Freeland, Mich. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Facebook and Twitter placed warning labels on -- but did not remove -- social media posts by President Donald Trump on Saturday after he urged North Carolina residents to show up to polling places even if they have already submitted a mail-in ballot, a practice state election officials have explicitly advised against.

(CNN)Facebook and Twitter placed warning labels on -- but did not remove -- social media posts by President Donald Trump on Saturday after he urged North Carolina residents to show up to polling places even if they have already submitted a mail-in ballot, a practice state election officials have explicitly advised against.

Trump claimed that North Carolina voters should "make sure your Ballot COUNTS" by visiting polling places to "see if it was COUNTED.

Patrick Gannon, a public information officer with the North Carolina State Board of Elections, told CNN's Maegan Vazquez and Nikki Carvajal in early September that there are three different ways for people to check the status of their ballots.

Last week, North Carolina's state board of elections said absentee ballots are counted after Election Day, and that voters who have already submitted a mail-in ballot will not be able to vote in-person on a regular ballot.

Those who "insist" on voting in-person will be given a provisional ballot, officials said, which may not be counted if voters have already submitted a mail-in ballot.

But in a separate statement to CNN, Twitter acknowledged it is a felony to vote more than once in the same election, citing last week's state-issued guidance.

"Per the North Carolina State Board of Elections, voting twice in the state is illegal," a Twitter spokesperson said in a statement.

Facebook has said it will limit some political advertising the week before Election Day, while Twitter this week introduced new rules on election misinformation that could result in greater enforcement against Trump's tweets.

Trump has repeatedly claimed in recent weeks, contrary to state election officials, that voters' mail-in ballots may not be counted.

Asked to explain why Trump's latest post was permitted to stand, Facebook spokesman Andy Stone cited the North Carolina advisory and its explanation of various safeguards to prevent double-voting.

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