Clear. 27.3   F New York
AI-Powered News Summarizer
Top Stories

Covid-19 infection grants immunity for five months, UK study suggests

January 14, 2021. Summarized by summa-bot.

Compression ratio: 61.3%. 1 min read.

A nurse wearing PPE works on a patient in the ICU (Intensive Care Unit) in St George's Hospital in Tooting, south-west London, where the number of intensive care beds for the critically sick has had to be increased from 60 to 120, the vast majority of which are for coronavirus patients. PA Photo. Picture date: Wednesday January 6, 2021. With the number of coronavirus cases continuing to rise across the country, staff at the hospital, one England's largest, say they are working "to the limit" of their ability, with exhausting shift patterns, and the prospect that the worst is still to come. See PA story HEALTH Coronavirus StGeorges. Photo credit should read: Victoria Jones/PA Wire

People who have been infected by Covid-19 may have immunity to the virus for around five months, according to preliminary findings in a new study led by Public Health England (PHE).

London (CNN)People who have been infected by Covid-19 may have immunity to the virus for around five months, according to preliminary findings in a new study led by Public Health England (PHE).

The SIREN research examined the impact of infection on more than 20,000 volunteer health workers from across the UK and a pre-print of the study found only 44 cases among 6,614 people.

Two groups of people, one with no evidence of previous infection and the other with evidence of past infection, were followed for up to six months.

The study -- which has not yet been peer reviewed -- concluded that past infection reduces the chances of catching the virus again by 83% for at least five months.

"About 6,000 of the healthcare workers were people who had evidence of having had SARS-CoV-2 infection. . .

and about 14,000 of the healthcare workers were people who had no evidence of previous SARS-CoV-2 infection," Tom Wingfield, senior clinical lecturer at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, told the UK's Science Media Centre.

"We now know that most of those who have had the virus, and developed antibodies, are protected from reinfection, but this is not total and we do not yet know how long protection lasts," Susan Hopkins, senior medical adviser at PHE and co-leader of the study, said according to Reuters.

But there is still a risk you could acquire an infection and transmit (it) to others," Hopkins said.

"This study supports the hypothesis that primary infection. . .

The researchers will continue to study antibody responses to infection and the impact of Covid-19 vaccines.

Summarizer is on Google News. Now you can get the latest AI summarized news on your favorite news platform.

Don't like Google News? We have an RSS Feed for you.

Suggestions