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Conservative Supreme Court majority gets another crack at the Voting Rights Act

March 1, 2021. Summarized by summa-bot.

Compression ratio: 21.1%. 1 min read.

PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA - NOVEMBER 04: People participate in a protest in support of counting all votes as the election in Pennsylvania is still unresolved on November 04, 2020 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. With no winner declared in the presidential election last night, all eyes are on the outcome in a few remaining swing states to determine whether Donald Trump will get another four years or Joe Biden will become the next president of the United States. The counting of ballots in Pennsylvania continued through the night with no winner yet announced. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

The Supreme Court is poised on Tuesday to hear a case that supporters of voting rights fear will lead the court's new conservative majority to weaken a key provision of the Voting Rights Act that prohibits laws that result in racial discrimination.

Washington (CNN)The Supreme Court is poised on Tuesday to hear a case that supporters of voting rights fear will lead the court's new conservative majority to weaken a key provision of the Voting Rights Act that prohibits laws that result in racial discrimination.

Holder, effectively gutting Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act, a provision that required states with a history of discrimination to obtain the permission of the federal government or the courts before enacting new laws related to voting.

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich, a Republican, and the Arizona Republican Party, appealed the case to the Supreme Court, defending the laws as "commonplace election administration provisions" used by Arizona and "dozens of states. "

Marc Elias, a lawyer for the DNC who handled dozens of cases fighting efforts to block the counting of votes and switching Electoral College votes in the aftermath of the 2020 presidential election, responded that Supreme Court precedents and the law "compelled the lower court to conclude that Arizona's wholesale rejection of ballots cast out-of-precinct and its criminalization of ballot collection violated Voting Rights Act. "

President Joe Biden's Justice Department has also weighed in with a letter to the court, departing from the position taken by the DNC and agreeing with the Trump administration that the Arizona laws didn't violate Section 2.

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