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Civil rights protesters from the 1950s and 1960s on their struggle -- and our present moment

June 15, 2020. Summarized by summa-bot.

The protests sweeping the US after George Floyd's death have brought echoes of the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, when activists led marches and staged lunch counter sit-ins and integrated bus rides to demand equal rights for African Americans.

(CNN)The protests sweeping the US after George Floyd's death have brought echoes of the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, when activists led marches and staged lunch counter sit-ins and integrated bus rides to demand equal rights for African Americans.

To gain a better understanding of how those historic events inform our present moment, CNN reached out to young men and women of that time — brave activists better known as the Freedom Riders, the Little Rock Nine and members of the Atlanta Student Movement.

Why people protest

Who is protesting

How they protest

NOW: Peaceful rallies and street protests with flashes of violence in places like Ferguson (2014), Baltimore (2015) and in numerous cities after the death of George Floyd

One Freedom Rider described how nonviolent civil rights protesters underwent training on how to respond when they were verbally abused or physically assaulted.

THEN: Rallies, speeches, opinion pieces, interviews with the news media, nonviolent protests that deliberately courted violence

One civil rights protester described how some white people in the 1950s and 1960s had their own weaponized language:

A member of the Little Rock Nine described her reaction to President Trump saying that protesters who breached the White House fence would be met by "vicious dogs":

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