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Capitol riot tears GOP apart as it seeks a return to power in 2022

January 14, 2021. Summarized by summa-bot.

Compression ratio: 22.4%. 2 min read.

Senator Rick Scott, a Republican from Florida, speaks during a television interview at the Russell Senate Office building in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2020. Senate Republicans dismissed concerns about an extended fight over the presidential election damaging the public's faith in voting or disrupting the transition process. Photographer: Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Florida Republican Sen. Rick Scott, the new chair of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, defended President Donald Trump on Wednesday when asked if his ally bore any responsibility for inciting a riot at the US Capitol, putting the onus of last week's death and destruction instead on the mob.

(CNN)Florida Republican Sen. Rick Scott, the new chair of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, defended President Donald Trump on Wednesday when asked if his ally bore any responsibility for inciting a riot at the US Capitol, putting the onus of last week's death and destruction instead on the mob.

Scott's comments came as the pro-Trump riot has torn apart the Republican Party, setting off a backlash among some donors, a historic second impeachment of the President and a fight over how best to build a path back to power.

The US Chamber of Commerce, corporate political action committees and major conservative donors are reevaluating whether they will donate to the 147 Republican members of Congress who objected to certifying the presidential election on the day of the attack in a deluded bid to overturn the results.

"We will take into account the totality of what candidates and elected officials do, including the actions of last week, and importantly, the actions in the days ahead in determining whether or not we support them," said Neil Bradley, the chamber executive vice president, on Tuesday.

But when pressed on what Missouri GOP Sen. Josh Hawley, who led the objection to the certification of the election in the Senate, would have to do to earn additional donations from the Chamber, Bradley said they would evaluate how members conducted themselves last week and in the days to come.

Missouri businessman Sam Fox, who donated $300,000 to a super PAC that aided Hawley's election in 2018, said in a statement that the senator "can certainly forget about any support from me again" after last week's events.

Eberhart said disaffected donors will "make up with Republicans pretty quickly" if the Democrats, who will soon control the White House and both chambers in Congress, "overreach" in their agenda.

Scott told CNN that he has three goals: presenting a "clear choice" to the country on how a Republican and Democratic Senate differ, raising more money and recruiting quality candidates.

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