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Breakthrough infections after vaccination are "very rare," experts say

April 15, 2021. Summarized by summa-bot.

Compression ratio: 27.2%. 3 min read.

The first US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention accounting of breakthrough coronavirus infections among fully vaccinated people shows such infections are very rare, Dr. Kawsar Talaat, an infectious disease physician and assistant professor at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, told CNN on Thursday. She said it actually underscores the urgency to vaccinate more people against Covid-19.

The first US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention accounting of breakthrough coronavirus infections among fully vaccinated people shows such infections are very rare, Dr. Kawsar Talaat, an infectious disease physician and assistant professor at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, told CNN on Thursday.

There remains some confusion around new research from the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom that compares the risk of a rare type of blood clot among people who have had Covid-19 with people who received the AstraZeneca, Moderna and Pfizer vaccines, Dr. Anthony Fauci said.

“Use of [Johnson & Johnson’s Covid-19] Janssen vaccine in Norway is postponed until more information is available from the ongoing investigations,” Geir Bukholm, director of infection control at the Institute of Public Health, said on Thursday.

Some background: The US Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday that they were recommending a pause in the use of the Johnson & Johnson Covid-19 vaccine.

In a news release on Wednesday, the European Medicines Agency said it “remains of the view that the benefits of the [Johnson & Johnson] vaccine in preventing COVID-19 outweigh the risks of side effects. ”

The agency in charge of verifying the safety of vaccines for the EU also said they are still assessing the “very rare cases of unusual blood clots with low platelets” with that vaccine and the “EMA is expediting this evaluation and currently expects to issue a recommendation next week. ”

As the pause of administering Johnson & Johnson Covid-19 vaccines in the United States continues, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration will keep the public informed about new developments, CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said Thursday.

As announced earlier this week, CDC and FDA recommended a pause in administering the Johnson & Johnson vaccine while we review data and assess significance around adverse events reported in six people," Walensky said.

Researchers at Oxford University have found the risk of a rare type of blood clot is low overall, but higher for people who have been infected with Covid-19 than among people who’ve had the three vaccines authorized in the UK – those made by AstraZeneca, Moderna and Pfizer.

The study, made available in pre-print on Thursday on the Oxford website ahead of publication in a scientific journal, says the risk of cerebral venous thrombosis or CVT – also known as cerebral venous sinus thrombosis or CVST – following Covid-19 infection is around “100 times greater than normal and several times higher than it is post vaccination or following influenza,” across all age groups.

When compared to the risk of clots from the three vaccines, the risk from infection is “between 8-10 times higher, and compared to the baseline, approximately 100 times higher for infection,” Oxford said in a news release.

Using an electronic health records network of over 500,000 Covid-19 positive cases, 489,871 vaccinated cases and 172,724 cases of influenza, the study found 30% of CVT cases occurred in the under-30 age group, the most at-risk for blood clots.

The WHO on Thursday said "for now the risk of suffering blood clots, is much higher for someone with COVID-19 than for someone who has taken the AstraZeneca vaccine. " WHO Regional Director for Europe Hans Kluge reiterated its recommendation of the AstraZeneca vaccine for all eligible adults, calling it "effective in reducing COVID-19 hospitalization and preventing deaths. ”

Norway will stop using the Oxford-AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine as part of its vaccination program because of the risk of side effects in the younger population, the Norwegian Institute of Public Health announced on Thursday.

The institute said there is now a “greater risk associated with the AstraZeneca vaccine than with the Covid-19 disease in Norway,” in a statement on its website.

Remember: The European Medicines Agency (EMA) said on April 7 that a particular combination of unusual blood clots with low blood platelet counts should be listed as a side effect of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, but stopped short of recommending its use be limited.

by summa-bot

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