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5 Chinese nationals among those charged with cyberhacking that victimized over 100 people and companies worldwide

September 16, 2020. Summarized by summa-bot.

Five Chinese and two Malaysian international cyberhackers were indicted in federal court on Wednesday for allegedly intruding on over 100 companies and people in the US and abroad through online games to launder "millions of dollars," the Justice Department announced Wednesday.

(CNN)Five Chinese and two Malaysian international cyberhackers were indicted in federal court on Wednesday for allegedly intruding on over 100 companies and people in the US and abroad through online games to launder "millions of dollars," the Justice Department announced Wednesday.

Jiang Lizhi, Qian Chuan and Fu Qiang are charged in a nine-count indictment that says they allegedly used Chengdu 404 Network Technology to target over 100 companies, organizations and people in the US, Asia and South America using "sophisticated hacking techniques. "

Jiang allegedly bragged that it was "easy to find companies to target by searching lists of publicly-traded companies through 'stock websites,'" the indictment says.

The non-profit's computers that were located in Washington, DC, were allegedly compromised by the hackers since 2018, according to the indictment.

Zhang Haoran and Tan Dailin were charged in a 25-count indictment for participating in a "Computer Hacking Conspiracy" that "sought to make money by hacking video game companies" and selling items like video game currency for profit.

One company labeled "Video Game Company#14" in the indictment had a database of approximately 25 million records of which the hackers allegedly obtained a copy.

The alleged criminal scheme used actors in China and Malaysia to illegally hack, intrude and steal information from victims worldwide," acting US Attorney Michael Sherwin said in a news release.

"This scheme also contained a new and troubling cyber-criminal component -- the targeting and utilization of gaming platforms to both defraud video game companies and launder illicit proceeds," Sherwin said.

Investigators with the US district court in Washington, DC, found through seizure warrants "hundreds of accounts, servers, domain names, and command-and-control 'dead drop' web pages used by the defendants to conduct their computer intrusion offenses," prosecutors said.

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